Health & Nutrition and Healthy Lifestyle

Inspirations to start a healthy lifestyle

June 24, 2013
by Andrea Berberich
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Seeds Of Death – Gary Null


This is a great movie to understand what the GMO food possible causes to our DNA. There hasn’t done enough research on GMO and the effect on animals and humans.

This movie is award-winning documentary that exposes the lies about GMOs. It also provide some background on the Big Agriculture’s new green revolution and how it becomes a dominant food supply.

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March 25, 2011
by Andrea Berberich
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What is wrong with what we eat?

I found this video very educational despite of the fact that it was posted on Ted.com on May 2008. It is thought provoking and makes me think twice to eat more protein than I really need to. The video explains humans way of consuming meats such as beef, pork, veal, chicken and how it impacts our environment and influences the climate change.

We make decisions on what we eat every day, let’s start making healthy choices that not only help you but also will help the environment and future generations. I thank Mark Bittman for this wonderful presentation. It also inspires me to become a locavore and pescaterian.

February 18, 2014
by Andrea Berberich
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Leukoaraiosis

Leukoaraiosis: A Hidden Cause Of Brain Aging

Life Extension has a great article on Leukoaraiosis. Here is a brief summary on Leukoaraiosis:

Leukoaraiosis is a common finding in stroke patients. Leukoaraiosis appears to be an independent predictor of stroke outcomes. Evidence from neuroimaging indicates that some leukoaraiosis is caused by white matter infarcts, which may be particularly frequent in patients with aggressive small vessel disease.

What Causes Leukoaraiosis?

Important to understand is that risk factors and diseases may trigger Small Vessel Disease (Leukoaraiosis):

Reference:

February 18, 2014
by Andrea Berberich
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Platelet Dysfunction

Platelet Dysfunction

Platelets are little pieces of blood cells. Platelets help wounds heal and prevent bleeding by forming blood clots. Your bone marrow makes platelets. Problems can result from having too few or too many platelets, or from platelets that do not work properly.

If your blood has a low number of platelets, you can be at risk for mild to serious bleeding. If your blood has too many platelets, you may have a higher risk of blood clots.  Treatment of platelet disorders depends on the cause.

It may prevent Platelet Dysfunction when adding Nutraceuticals:

Anthocyanins are the reds, blues, purples, and magentas found in food are breated by anthocyanin pigments. Other types of flavonoid pigments, called flavones and flavonols, are also found alongside the anthocyanins and provide food with some of their vibrant yellow colors.
Astaxanthin is considered an antioxidant. It is water-soluble and Lipid-soluble antioxidants.

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February 18, 2014
by Andrea Berberich
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Mitochondrial Dysfunction

Mitochondrial Dysfunction

Mitochondria

Mitochondria are like the cell’s batteries. To produce energy, mitochrondria need a steady supply of fatty acids and branched-chain amino acids, and carnitine carries these nutrients to them.

Recommendations that may prevent mitochondrial dysfunction are:

  • Acetyl-L-carnitine
  • Lipoic Acid
  • CoQ10
  • PQQ (**)

(**) PQQ is ubiquitous in the natural world. Its presence in interstellar stardust has led some experts to hypothesize a pivotal role for PQQ in the evolution of life on Earth. It has been found in all plant species tested to date. Neither humans nor the bacteria that colonize the human digestive tract have demonstrated the ability to synthesize it. This has led researchers to classify PQQ as an essential micronutrient.

Reference:

  • Haas E. M. & Levin B. (2006). Staying healthy with nutrition: The complete guide to diet and nutritional
    medicine. Berkeley, California. Celestial Arts.
  • Holford P. (2004). The optimum nutrition bible. Berkeley, California: Crossing Press.
  • Life Extension

February 18, 2014
by Andrea Berberich
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Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is a disorder of energy utilization and storage, diagnosed by a co-occurrence of 3 out of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal (central) obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density cholesterol (HDL) levels. Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, particularly heart failure, and diabetes.

Life Extension recommends the following nutraceuticals to prevent Metabolic Syndrome:

  • Chromium
  • Curcumin
  • Green Tea Extract
  • Omega-3 Fatty Acids
  • Probiotics
  • Resveratrol
  • Magnesium (**)
  • Blueberries could help protect against metabolic syndrome effects

(**)  Increased magnesium intake association with reduced insulin resistance in men and women with metabolic syndrome.

Reference:

February 18, 2014
by Andrea Berberich
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Endothelial Dysfunction

Endothelial Dysfunction

Endothelial Dysfunction is a systemic pathological state of the endothelium (the inner lining of blood vessels) and can be broadly defined as an imbalance between vasodilating and vasoconstricting substances produced by (or acting on) the endothelium. Normal functions of endothelial cells include mediation of coagulation, platelet adhesion, immune function and control of volume and electrolyte content of the intravascular and extravascular spaces.

Lef.org recommends following nutraceuticals to reduce or eliminate Endothelial Dysfunction:

  • Pomegranate
  • Lipoic Acid
  • Amla(**)
  • Resveratrol
  • Green Tea
  • Coenzyme Q10 supplement

(**) Amla also known as Amalaki or Indian Gooseberry. According to Ayurveda, Amla may be used as a rasayana (rejuvenative) to promote longevity and has traditionally been used to support digestion, heart health, healthy vision, hair growth, and enliven the body. Its antioxidant properties help fight free radical damage and support healthy aging.

Reference:

  • Haas E. M. & Levin B. (2006). Staying healthy with nutrition: The complete guide to diet and nutritional
    medicine. Berkeley, California. Celestial Arts.
  • Holford P. (2004). The optimum nutrition bible. Berkeley, California: Crossing Press.
  • Life Extension
  • Wikipedia.org
  • HerbalProvider.com

February 17, 2014
by Andrea Berberich
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Homocysteine

Homocysteine

I highly recommend anyone who gets a blood test should know what his/her homocysteine levels are. Most traditional doctors don’t even look at the Homocysteine and it turns out to be a very important evaluation of your overall health.
Homocysteine is produced from the amino acid methionine, which is found in normal dietary protein. Homocysteine in itself isn’t bad news–your body naturally turns it into one of two beneficial substances. These are called glutathione (the body’s most important antioxidant) and a methyl donor SAMe (S-adenosylmethionine; a very important type of “intelligent” nutrient for both the brain and body).

High Homocysteine Risk Factors

  • Genetic Inheritance: Family history of heart disease, strokes, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, dchizophrenia, or diabetes
  • Deficiency of Folate
  • Increasing of Age
  • Estrogen deficiency
  • Excessive Alcohol, Coffee, or Tea intake
  • Smoking
  • Lack of Exercise
  • Hostility and repressed anger
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • H.pylori-generated Ulcer
  • Pregnancy
  • Strict vegetarian or vegan
  • High-fat diet with excessive read meat
  • High Salt intake

The H Factor Diet

  • Eat less fatty meat and more fish and vegetable protein
  • Eat your green
  • Have a clove of garlic a day
  • Don’t add salt to your food
  • Cut back on tea and coffee
  • Limit your alcohol
  • Reduce your stress
  • Stop smoking
  • Correct estrogen deficiency
  • Supplement a high-strength multivitamin every day
  • Take Homocysteine supplements

Reference:

  • Haas E. M. & Levin B. (2006). Staying healthy with nutrition: The complete guide to diet and nutritional
    medicine. Berkeley, California. Celestial Arts.
  • Holford P. (2004). The optimum nutrition bible. Berkeley, California: Crossing Press.
  • LEF.org (http://www.lef.org)

February 17, 2014
by Andrea Berberich
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Decreased Brain Blood Flow

Decreased Brain Blood Flow

Brain Blood Flow

Small vessel disease deprives local areas of the brain of sufficient blood supply to carry out normal activities may lead to diseases such as Dementia, Alzheimer and/or Leukoaraiosis.

Lef.org recommends to add following supplements such as

  • Ginkgo
  • Gastrodin (Gastrodia Orchid Extract)
  • Vinpocetine (**)

(**) Vinpocetine is a substance that can be made from an alkaloid found in the periwinkle plant (called vincamine). This substance passes rapidly across the blood-brain barrier and acts inside the brain like a neuro protectant. Some of the nerve protection provided by vinpocetine may be related to its antioxidant activity, as well as to its ability to stop overactivation of the nerves and to prevent depletion of ATP (Adenosine triphosphate). Vinpocetine has been successfully used to help improve “cerebrovascular deficiencies” — problems related to insufficient blood flow throughout the brain.

Reference:

  • Haas E. M. & Levin B. (2006). Staying healthy with nutrition: The complete guide to diet and nutritional
    medicine. Berkeley, California. Celestial Arts.
  • LEF.org

February 17, 2014
by Andrea Berberich
0 comments

Hypertension – High Blood Pressure

Hypertension – High Blood Pressure

Hypertension - High Blood Pressure

A map published by the CDC shows Prevalence of Hypertension in 2011.

Hypertension or high blood pressure can be caused by atherosclerosis (a narrowing and thickening of the arteries), arterial tension, or thicker blood. Arterial tension is controlled by the balance of calcium, magnesium, and potassium in relation to sodium (salt).

Correction this balance can lower blood pressure in thirty days. Patrick Holford recommends the following supplement regiment:

  • Multivitamin and Multi-mineral
  • Antioxidant Complex
  • Vitamin C 1,000 g (2x)
  • Bone Mineral Complex (providing 500 mg Calcium & 300 mg Magnesium)
  • EPA/DHA Fish Oils 1,200 to 2,400 mg or eat oily fish
  • Vitamin E 600 IU

Life Extension recommends additional supplements and these also prevent Leukoaraiosis:

  • Aged garlic Extract
  • CoQ10
  • Ginger
  • Melantonin

Diet Advice

Avoid Sales and foods with added salt. Increase your intake of fruit (at least three pieces a day) and vegetables, which are rich in potassium. Take a tablespoon of ground seeds(**) as a source of extra calcium and magnesium. Eat poached, grilled, or baked tuna, salmon, herring, or mackerel twice a week.
(**) Flax Seed, Low Carb Whole Grain

Reference:

  • Haas E. M. & Levin B. (2006). Staying healthy with nutrition: The complete guide to diet and nutritional
    medicine. Berkeley, California. Celestial Arts.
  • Holford P. (2004). The optimum nutrition bible. Berkeley, California: Crossing Press.
  • LEF.org (http://www.lef.org)

February 10, 2014
by Andrea Berberich
0 comments

Menopause – Alleviating Symptoms

Menopause – Alleviating Symptoms

Every women eventually will go through menopause, sometimes with absolutely no symptoms and sometimes with too many to handle. Ironically men don’t think that they are going through aging-related hormone change, but they do go through hormonal changes just like women.  It is sometimes also called “male menopause” or “Andropause.”

For women menopause symptoms can be and are not limited to:

  • Change in the frequency of volume of blood flow of the periods
  • Irritability
  • Hot Flashes and night sweats
  • Emotional swings
  • Headaches
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Loss of sex drives
  • Weight changes
  • Vaginal dryness and a weakening of the vaginal area tissues may occur
  • Potential bone loss
  • Metabolic Shifts

Poor diet, emotional stress, and a lack of exercise may lead to an increase in symptoms, particularly when these lifestyle habits have been going on for years.

A good diet along with supportive nutritional supplements and stress management may help to delay the onset of menopause and reduce symptoms when they do occur. Positive lifestyle habits, regular exercise is the most important.

Click image for enlarge image.
Menopause is a fact of life

Menopausal Symptoms – What Works?

The usual remedy prescribed by doctors is HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy), but that is now being actively discouraged owing to the proven increased risk of breast cancer, what works without the risk?

  • Exercise. According to a study of Swedish women conducted by Lund University, the more vigorous physical exercise you do the less likely you are to suffer from hot flashes.
  • Blood Sugar Control. The best way to control this is to eat low-glycemic-load carbohydrates with protein.
  • Vitamins C and E. Vitamin C helps hormones work. When choosing supplement make sure it contains berry extract and rich in bioflavonoids. Vitamin E is another all-round hormonal helper, it helps vaginal dryness but it takes at least a month to work.
  • Essential Fats. They are so essential for balancing hormones and mood that it is recommended to eat seeds (flax, sesame, sunflower, pumpkin) and daily supplementing some EPA (300mg), DHA (200 mg), and GLA (100 mg).
  • Soy, isoflavones, and red clover reduces approximately halve the incidence and severity of hot flashes.
  • Black Cohosh helps with hot flashes, sweating, insomnia, and anxiety. Daily recommended amount 50 mg up to 500 mg. It also helps raise serotonin and relieves depression and potentially insomnia.
  • St. John’s Wort with the combination of black cohosh is effective for women who experience depression, irritability, and fatigue. St. John’s Wort also renowned for its antidepressant, has been demonstrated to relieve other menopausal symptoms including headaches, palpitations, lack of concentrations, and decreased libido.
  • Dong Quai herb for hot flashes, botanically called Angelica Sinensis,  has been found in big reduction of hot flashes, almost 80%.
  • Progesterone Cream, body-identical progesterone, often called “natural progesterone,” reduces cancer risk and works well for menopausal symptoms. A trial in the United states, published in the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology found that progesterone cream significantly relieved or arrested in symptoms in 83% of women, compared with 19% of women on placebo.

    Reference: